Archive for October, 2011

Weekly Update!

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Hi again!

Another week has passed which marks the end of the first of the two programming courses that I am taking this semester. This last week was concluded with the covering of pointers, as well as the completion of the small management game that I was talking about before, on which I worked together with Tim Eklund and Ludvig Mattsson.

Next on the horizon is the second programming course, but the following few days will be spent in our capital Stockholm where the game exhibition Gamex will take place. Me and co-worker Max Nilsson from 2 Hour Lunch Studios will be showing Sjörök, so feel free to swing by us if you are there.

Regards

Jakob Lindh

 

Weekly Update!

Monday, October 24th, 2011

Hi!

There has been a lot going on since my last update which is the reason for this one being a tad late, but lets go!

The programming course I am taking is moving along and we have now covered arrays and functions, as well as basic class functionality. This week we are covering pointers, and we have also just started doing small one-week game projects with two to three students in each project. Me and two other students are working on a turn based management game which will be playable in the windows console. In the game you control and build a small town and help it prosper over several years.

That was a little about what is happening in the programming course. Another very exciting thing that has happened is that the trading company of which I am one of seven part owners, has released its first game! Sjörök is the name of the game, and the company’s name is 2 Hour Lunch Studios. You can grab the game for free over at our website and also find more information there. Enjoy!

Regards

Jakob Lindh

 

Weekly Update

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

Hi!

The past week have been spent with getting to know C++ and its basic functionalities. At the course I’m taking, we have covered initial concepts such as datatypes and expressions, conditional programming and looping e.t.c. And this week we are moving on with arrays and functions. As the course continues we will be covering more advanced topics like classes and pointers. Programming is really exciting, and once you get into it it is a great deal of fun!

I think it is of great value to all game designers to have at least a basic understanding of programming. It will not only allow you to design and implement more interesting and effective systems and game mechanics, but it also lets you communicate at another level with the programmers of your team, and allow for a faster and more efficient workflow. This probably goes for all other areas of game development as well. Having a little knowledge of other fields than your own, regardless of your own position, be it game designer, programmer, graphical artist, sound designer e.t.c, goes along way.

Regards

Jakob Lindh

Weekly Update

Sunday, October 2nd, 2011

Hi!

I’ll continue this week by summing up my intial work with Unity 3D and talk about what lies on the horizon for the coming weeks.

Unity 3D

So, as you know I’ve been working with Unity 3D for the last couple of weeks now, getting to know the engine and its functions better. The physics game that I am working on is coming along and has advanced further in its development. I’ve changed the players interaction from placing objects to actually manipulating the ones that are already on the playfield. As of now the player can rotate the triangles on the playfield to help get the ragdoll all the way to goal.

 

The physics game so far. Work in progress.

 

All in all, I have liked working with the very easy-to-use Unity 3D game engine and will continue to do so in the future. Although, there will be a break from this work in the coming weeks as I develop my programming skills.

Coming up

For the next ten weeks I will be attending two classes at Blekinge Institute of Technology which focus on object oriented programming using the language C++. For a long time I’ve been wanting to get more experience in the field of programming to make it easier to realize more advanced game play ideas, and also to be able to  fully utilize game engines like Unity 3D with all of its programming power.

Regards

Jakob Lindh